8/13/12

#4: Fog Blog! Five Fundy Fog Facts

Due to the fog, today marks our sixth consecutive day on land. The Nereid team last attempted to run a survey on Tuesday August 7, but had to return to the dock after a couple of hours because of the fog they encountered. Our next potential day out may be tomorrow, so please keep your fingers crossed for both teams! In the meantime, here are five Fundy fog facts:

1. For our location and purposes, southerly winds = not great news. Northerly winds = better news. Wind coming from a southerly direction has passed over the Atlantic ocean, creating moisture-rich air. Wind coming from a northerly direction usually has passed over land (New Brunswick), creating a drier air. Here, air laden with moisture can lead to fog, whereas dry air will not.


Inspiration for this blog. 12 August 2012.

2. When the dew point is the same as the air temperature, fog will form. This weather site for nearby Grand Manan makes comparing these values simple. An important thing to be aware of to help avoid this scenario while out in the Bay:


Not ideal survey conditions.

3. Whale blows can be heard better in fog. Foggy air is more dense because of the water molecules, so the sound travels better and faster...

4. ... yet while we might be able to hear the whales better, it doesn't really make our work any easier. It's difficult to photograph whales in fog!


Exhibit A.

5. Right whale researchers start to go a little crazy when stuck on land for too many days straight. The perk? Our amazing Claudia comforts us with food. Yesterday, it was pancakes with local blueberries.


Flipping fruity flapjacks.


6 comments:

  1. Thanks for the great explanation regarding the conditions that prevent you from going out. Rough seas were my concerns. We'll wish for calm seas and clear skies with lots of right whales for the near future.

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    1. That would be wonderful, thank you :)

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  2. I really appreciate your explanation of the causes of the weather conditions in the Bay of Fundy, and the way it effects your work. I also enjoy hearing about the wonerful culinary fare served to those deserving researchers.
    Carol Zani

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    1. Glad to hear it, Carol! Thanks for your support!

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  3. I can tell from the clever alliteration that you're starting to get cabin fever. Wishing you all a bunch of fog-free, Fundy-filled fun. ;)

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